Differences Between Flowering & Nonflowering Plant Activities

Ferns are an example of a nonflowering plant.

The best way to make science class interesting for students is to give them hands-on or creative activities. When you teach students about flowering and nonflowering plants, take this into account and try to keep instruction and review activities as engaging as possible. Make sure that you have activities that appeal to kinesthetic, visual and linguistic learners so that they can all benefit. Does this Spark an idea?

Exploration and Dissection

Perhaps the most obvious way to help students understand the differences between flowering and nonflowering plants is to give them hands-on experience with both types. Either bring them samples of ferns, lichens and mosses, as well as some flowering plants with obvious reproductive parts, or go on a nature walk with them and let them collect some for themselves. They can then dissect the flowering and nonflowering plants. Show them take apart the flowers and compare them to diagrams, and point out the spores and lack of roots on the nonflowering plants.

Graphic Organizers

Visual learners will benefit from using graphic organizers, such as two-column charts or Venn diagrams, to compare and contrast flowering and nonflowering plants. Create the graphic organizer on the board and start students off by writing one similarity between flowering and nonflowering plants (e.g., both do photosynthesis) and one difference (e.g., flowering plants contain seeds, whereas nonflowering plants do not). Students then work in small groups or individually to complete the rest of the graphic organizers. Groups discuss their results with each other when they finish.

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Creative Writing Assignment

For your creative or linguistically inclined students, consider offering a creative writing assignment that will allow them to show you how well they understand the differences between flowering and nonflowering plants. Make the assignment open-ended, but give students some ideas, such as writing a conversation between several different types of plants about how they reproduce, writing a story about one plant that finds out how other plants are not quite like her, or even a poem about the differences between the two types of plants. Display students’ assignments for the rest of the class to read, or encourage them to read the results aloud.


Differences Between Flowering & Nonflowering Plant Activities

Ferns are an example of a nonflowering plant.

The best way to make science class interesting for students is to give them hands-on or creative activities. When you teach students about flowering and nonflowering plants, take this into account and try to keep instruction and review activities as engaging as possible. Make sure that you have activities that appeal to kinesthetic, visual and linguistic learners so that they can all benefit. Does this Spark an idea?

Exploration and Dissection

Perhaps the most obvious way to help students understand the differences between flowering and nonflowering plants is to give them hands-on experience with both types. Either bring them samples of ferns, lichens and mosses, as well as some flowering plants with obvious reproductive parts, or go on a nature walk with them and let them collect some for themselves. They can then dissect the flowering and nonflowering plants. Show them take apart the flowers and compare them to diagrams, and point out the spores and lack of roots on the nonflowering plants.

Graphic Organizers

Visual learners will benefit from using graphic organizers, such as two-column charts or Venn diagrams, to compare and contrast flowering and nonflowering plants. Create the graphic organizer on the board and start students off by writing one similarity between flowering and nonflowering plants (e.g., both do photosynthesis) and one difference (e.g., flowering plants contain seeds, whereas nonflowering plants do not). Students then work in small groups or individually to complete the rest of the graphic organizers. Groups discuss their results with each other when they finish.

READ  Differences Between Flowering & Nonflowering Plant Activities

Creative Writing Assignment

For your creative or linguistically inclined students, consider offering a creative writing assignment that will allow them to show you how well they understand the differences between flowering and nonflowering plants. Make the assignment open-ended, but give students some ideas, such as writing a conversation between several different types of plants about how they reproduce, writing a story about one plant that finds out how other plants are not quite like her, or even a poem about the differences between the two types of plants. Display students’ assignments for the rest of the class to read, or encourage them to read the results aloud.