Games That Work On An Ati Open Source Driver

Top inside view of a graphics card, which is what determines graphics quality on a computer.

Certain ATI graphics cards use OpenGL-standard open source drivers to communicate with a computer’s operating system. Open source means that if you sell or give the driver software away, you must give away the source code with it, so the person receiving the driver can manipulate it. Although all games are compatible with and are supposed to work with an open source graphics card driver, only some actually do.

Neverball

The Neverball game is an action game, puzzle game and skill game rolled into one. The most current version is version 1.5.4, in which the player must guide a ball through a course, or a maze, and is essentially an obstacle course. This game runs on Linux, Win2K/XP, FreeBSD, and Mac OSX operating systems and will run on any hardware equipped with ATI and any other graphics card using accelerated OpenGL software drivers. This game is available at Neverball.org.

Chromium BSU

Chromium BSU is a typical “shoot-em-up” game. The player is a Captain and controls a cargo ship. The ship, driven by the Captain, has to bring supplies to the “troops stationed at the front lines.” This game states it runs on many different types of graphics cards, but they must have OpenGL open source acceleration. Chromium BSU is available for Linux and Windows, although the game maker no longer provides support for the Windows version. This game is available for download on the official website at reptilelabour.com.

Quake 4

Quake 4 is a “first-person shooter” perspective game. You must enter your birth date to enter the website to download the game, as it is rated “M” for mature audiences. The Quake Warriors must fight against an alien race to save a machine. This game also needs accelerated OpenGL to work properly and is available for Windows, Linux and Mac. Quake 4 is available on the official website at activision.com.

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Cube 2: Sauerbraten

This game is another “first-person shooter” game. The second version of the game Cube, Cube 2: Sauerbraten allows the player to edit the game during play. If the player does not like the background used at any given time, he can change it, if he does not like the textures, he can change them. Because the entire game is open source, the player can manipulate any part of it if he wishes. The game is available for Linux, Windows and Mac and works best with OpenGL accelerated drivers. Cube 2 is available to download at sauerbraten.org.