Use Foldables In The Science Classroom

Teachers sometimes refer to Foldables as “study oragami.”

According to Dinah Zike, the inventor of Foldables, graphic organizers allow instructors to quickly organize data so that students grasp concepts more easily. In addition, students can use the Foldables or other graphic organizers to later organize study notes, science projects and research for essays. Another benefit of Foldables, being student-generated study guides, is that students retain information more readily when they play a role in the development of the study guide.

Instructions

1. Instruct the children in your class to fold their sheets of paper in half horizontally.

2. Instruct the children to take their scissors and cut a 1 inch tab from the bottom of the top fold, with the fold crease on the far end from the student. Call the smaller folded section the “Cause and Effect” section and the larger folded section the “Title” section.

3. Write the title of the Foldable on the part of the title section that sticks out after the 1 inch tab is cut away. For example, if the lesson teaches the students the effect of adding an acid to a base, they should write “Neutralization Reaction.”

4. Draw a line from the crease to the edge of both sides of the cause and effect section. This should split both sides of the cause and effect section in half.

5. Write a cause in the left-hand half of the outside of the cause and effect section. In the example of neutralization reactions, the student should write, “Acid and base mix.”

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6. Write the effect in the right-hand half of the outside of the cause and effect section. In the example of neutralization reactions, the student should write, “The acid and base are neutralized in relation to the quantity of moles of each.”

7. Write the list of causes in the right-hand on the inside of the cause and effect section. In the example of neutralization reactions, the student could write, “Acid molecules donate hydrogen atoms in the presence of an alkaline molecule.” Continue with all of the parts of the process that cause an effect.

8. Write the list of effects in the left-hand on the inside of the cause and effect section. In the example of neutralization reactions, the student could write, “The hydrogen particles from acids bond with the hydroxide particles from bases, forming water.”

9. Write the summarization of the cause and effect on the inside of the title section. Encourage students to add their own notes, interpretations and observations.